Why SAFE4R?

SAFE4R is reimagining what it means to feel safe – for you, your loved ones, and for everyone around you. Personal safety whether for a life threatening, sudden, medial emergency or from an encounter with a criminal situation, is no longer just for a select few. It is for all of us.

Crime Is Not Going Away

Human Trafficking Cases in U.S.
Burglary Cases
Homicide Cases
Theft Cases
Sexual Assualt Cases
Violent Crime in 2018
Property Crime in 2018

IN MEDICAL EMERGENCIES QUICK RESPONSE CAN MAKE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LIFE AND DEATH

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests occur outside of the hospital each year. In 2015, any-mention sudden cardiac arrest mortality in the US was 366,807. CPR, especially if administered immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival.

Drowning

Drowning is the 3rd leading cause of unintentional injury death worldwide, accounting for 7% of all injury-related deaths. There are an estimated 320 000 annual drowning deaths worldwide.

Strokes

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), stroke is the fifth-leadingTrusted Source cause of death in the United States. Every year, more than 795,000Trusted Source U.S. people have a stroke.

The Answer: The SAFE4R SAFETY NET

Article 1: ‘Bystander effect’ and sexual assault: What the research says

Over 50 years of research has documented a “bystander effect” in which witnesses fail to intervene in emergency situations, often because they assume someone else will take action.

Article 2: “The everyday heroism effect, or instinct to act on behalf of others, is very powerful”

Article 3: Your Role in Preventing Sexual Assault

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/08/bystander-effect-is-myth-urban-violence-psychological-study/ “The fact that bystanders are much more active than we think is a positive and reassuring story for potential victims of violence and the public as a whole. We need to develop crime prevention efforts which build on the willingness of bystanders to intervene.” The 'bystander effect' The study looked at 219 video recordings of arguments and assaults and found that, contrary to the “bystander effect” theory – which suggests people are less likely to step in to help if others are present – victims were actually more likely to be helped when there were more bystanders present. License and Republishing World Economic Forum articles may be republished in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License, and in accordance with our Terms of Use. Written by Kate Whiting, Senior Writer, Formative Content The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.